Bird ID

Discussion forum for getting a butterfly identified.
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David M
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Bird ID

Postby David M » Mon Jan 01, 2018 10:57 pm

Spent a while on the Gower coast late morning today, and I noticed several birds which I first thought were sparrows chasing the flies that were basking in the microclimate afforded by the sheltered Limeslade Bay.

I soon realised they were not sparrows. They had a 'pipit' look to them. Can anyone provide a positive ID?

1Oizo(1).jpg

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bugboy
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Re: Bird ID

Postby bugboy » Mon Jan 01, 2018 11:21 pm

It's either a Rock or Water Pipit David, I'm not familiar enough with them to say which though. Looking at my Collins guide it looks to have features of both but then they are very similar and there is a bit of 'cross-over' with some of the diagnostic features, particularly in their winter plumage.
Some addictions are good for the soul!

jenks
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Re: Bird ID

Postby jenks » Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:33 am

Hello all and a Happy New Year to all.

I agree with Bugboy but I would add this. Knowing the location, i.e. rocky coast, it`s more likely to be Rock Pipit. Water Pipits usually winter in the UK and frequent flooded fields, rivers, where there is fresh water rather than saline. The River Ogmore at Ogmore Bay is a known location for Water Pipits in Glamorgan. They usually have a more pronounced supercilium ( eye-stripe) too than RP`s and yours doesn`t seem to have that.

Jenks.

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Wurzel
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Re: Bird ID

Postby Wurzel » Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:16 am

I would go for Rock Pipit for this bird - it lacks the supercilium which Jenks mentions, it looks 'smudgier' with less defined markings and the striping extends further down the belly, Water Pipits appear 'cleaner', hope that helps :D . On the South coast we also have the Scandanavian race to contend with when making an ID as well, that's birders - they love 'splitting' :roll: :wink:

Have a goodun

Wurzel

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David M
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Location: South Wales

Re: Bird ID

Postby David M » Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:14 pm

Thanks, guys.

At least I got the 'pipit' bit right! :D

jenks
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Re: Bird ID

Postby jenks » Sat Jan 06, 2018 4:49 pm

Wurzel said " that's birders - they love 'splitting". How true ! How many subspecies of Yellow Wagtail do we have in Britain and Europe ? And Herring Gulls split into Yellow legged Gull and Caspian Gull. Butterflies may have aberrations listed but at least remain conspecific ( I think ! ).

Jenks


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