Neil Hulme

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Sat Dec 30, 2017 4:37 pm

Happy New Year, Wurzel. My brother looks in on my diary, so I'm sure he'll appreciate your comment.
BWs, Neil

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bugboy
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby bugboy » Sat Dec 30, 2017 6:03 pm

I agree with Wurzel, an interesting range of styles as well, I like the black and white images. I must have glanced at his images hundreds of times as a regular(ish) visitor to the London WWT. I'll pay closer attention next time I go :)

Also great work with all that habitat work you and your team have been doing, I've enjoyed watching things develop through your posts :). If I could have made it down to help myself I would have. It's good we are experiencing a decent winter to also help the Fritillaries (not to mention all our other native wildlife) along, fingers crossed for a bumper crop in 2018 :D
Some addictions are good for the soul!

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Jack Harrison » Sat Dec 30, 2017 6:29 pm

I came across Mark’s work by accident when visiting WWT Arundel earlier this year.

My reaction : “Those information boards and illustrations are good but could do with replacement by less faded versions.” Then I saw who they were by. (Hardly Mark's fault that the boards were "tired")

I have met Mark (when I was with your Neil) in a meadow near Billingshurst.

Jack

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David M
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby David M » Sun Dec 31, 2017 9:52 pm

Your fraternal family links remind me of the Lewingtons, Neil. Your brother is very talented artistically, and I'm sure deep (or not so deep) down you have that trait in you as well.

If you weren't a butterfly species champion I'm sure you could be a photographer/artist.

Some folk just 'have it'.

All the best for 2018.

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Jack Harrison » Sun Dec 31, 2017 10:29 pm

David M : If you [Neil] weren't a butterfly species champion I'm sure you could be a photographer/artist.
Neil always claims - unconvincingly - that he has nil understanding of the technical aspects of photography. Transfer that lack of expertise (?) to art and presumably he wouldn't know which end of the paint brush to use but would somehow "muddle through".

Jack

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:15 pm

Thanks, both.
Now I didn't say that I couldn't draw or paint, Jack, just nowhere near as good as my brother. But I don't think that the ability to increase/decrease the exposure setting maketh a photographic technician.
BWs, Neil

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:19 pm

Clapham Coppice Coupe Completed

Today (4th January) we finished cutting the first of two Hazel coppice coupes in a wood at Clapham, near Worthing. Many thanks to today's team of Bekah and Chloe (SDNPA rangers), Helen, Ellie and Paul (BC) and Boaz (local hero).

FFTF Church Copse 4.1.18.jpg
FFTF Church Copse 4.1.18 (2).jpg

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Sun Jan 14, 2018 8:44 pm

Working In Pete's Wood

Many thanks to South Downs Volunteer Rangers Jo, Clare, Sathiampama, Natasha and Eugenia for helping out today (14 January) at 'Pete's Wood' near Small Dole. Three of us worked with brushcutters to cut bramble and scrub from several small clearings, including two areas that hold the Dutch Elm Disease-resistant cultivars which the Sussex Branch donated in 2010. I'm pleased to report that they're growing very well. Meanwhile the rest of the group cleared and burned-up brash from a recent felling.

FFTF Longlands Wood work party 14.1.18 (1).jpg
FFTF Longlands Wood work party 14.1.18 (4).jpg
FFTF Longlands Wood work party 14.1.18 (2).jpg
FFTF Longlands Wood work party 14.1.18 (3).jpg
FFTF Longlands Wood work party 14.1.18 (5).jpg

While this was going on there was an excellent turnout for the work party at BC Rowland Wood

FFTF Rowland Wood work party 14.1.18.jpg

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bugboy
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby bugboy » Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:12 pm

Haha, looks like Minnie Padfield even turned up to that work party :lol:
Some addictions are good for the soul!

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David M
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby David M » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:36 pm

bugboy wrote:Haha, looks like Minnie Padfield even turned up to that work party :lol:


Yes, it DOES look very like her, Bugboy! :)

Looks like a healthy gathering once again, Neil. I just hope this week's forecast storms don't do any damage. :(

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Jack Harrison » Mon Jan 15, 2018 6:02 pm

David M. I just hope this week's forecast storms don't do any damage.

If the October1987 storm can be viewed as a precedent when it cleared a lot of woodland, Neil's team might regret the wasted effort if nature does it for them :(

The worse damage from any storms might be the misguided contractors who want to make everything look neat and tidy afterwards.

Jack

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Tue Jan 16, 2018 6:13 pm

Thanks, all. The cute Minnie lookalike is Max. He usually gets half the crab-sticks in my packed lunch.
At the risk of doing a 'Michael Fish', what storms? We're due for nothing harsher than a stiff breeze in balmy Sussex.
BWs, Neil

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Tue Jan 16, 2018 6:16 pm

Cutting For Pearls - Cowdray Estate

Many thanks to the South Downs Volunteer Ranger Service for their work helping to create and maintain habitat for the Pearl-bordered Fritillary on the Cowdray Estate today (16 January). Ten of us coppiced an area of Sweet Chestnut and cleared conifer brash from the edge of a recently widened ride. The estate has been hugely supportive of this work and done much itself to benefit butterflies and other wildlife.

FFTF VRS work party Cowdray Estate 16.1.18.jpg

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Jack Harrison » Tue Jan 16, 2018 6:57 pm

With all this clearance to make PB Frit habitat, one day it might be simpler to produce maps showing where PB Frits DON’T occur :P

Well done Neil.

BTW. Do you address Viscount Cowdray (Michael Pearson) as Mick or Mike?

Jack

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David M
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby David M » Wed Jan 17, 2018 5:25 pm

Thanks for the canine update, Neil. Nice to learn Max gets a reward for his attendance!

Love the lattermost image of the clearing. That looks to be a potential violet paradise.....no doubt leading to PBF heaven too!

Good luck!

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:12 pm

Hi Jack. I haven't had the pleasure, but his head forester is as good as they come.
Thanks, David. I'm hoping that we've saved a very small and ailing PBF colony here, just in the nick of time.
BWs, Neil

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:14 pm

Clapham Coppicers

A group of eleven, comprising SDNPA Ranger Bekah, the regular coppice group, and BC Sussex volunteers Helen and Paul, made great progress cutting the second Hazel coupe of the winter at Clapham Wood today (18 January). The next work party will start here at 10 am on Thursday 1st February, meeting at Clapham Church. All welcome.

FFTF Coppicing at Clapham 18.1.18 (small).jpg

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Matsukaze
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Matsukaze » Thu Jan 18, 2018 10:20 pm

Excellent works - I would love to be following the woodmen with actinic light and sheet. Is the work likely to benefit many moths as well as the fritillaries?

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Neil Hulme
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Re: Neil Hulme

Postby Neil Hulme » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:24 am

Thanks, Matsukaze. I think the short answer is 'yes', although I couldn't tell you which species, as I try to resist being sucked in by 'the dark side'. I would guess that more species of moth are associated with Hazel coppice than with Sweet Chestnut, but these snippets lifted directly from a BC factsheet on Sweet Chestnut give some idea of the huge diversity associated with that plant:

"Over 70 species of moths feed on Sweet Chestnut in the larval stage, although this is not the primary foodplant and larvae (caterpillars) tend to be found at low density. This total is comparable to those utilising Wych Elm Ulmus glabra, Alder Alnus glutinosa and Beech as hostplants. Several nationally scarcer species, such as Scarce Merveille du Jour Moma alpium, typically associated with oak, and Waved Carpet Hydrelia sylvata, have been found feeding on the leaves of Sweet Chestnut, whilst many, more widespread moths, such as the local Brindled White-spot Parectropis similaria, will also eat Sweet Chestnut.

"The diversity within Sweet Chestnut coppice is indicated by the fact that over 200 species have been recorded on a single June night at a site in Sussex. Some species may have a preference for the early stages of the coppice cycle which can support a wide range of woodland herbs in the ground flora. These herbs are fed on by many species, for example the nationally scarce plume moth Capperia britanniodactyla which is associated with Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia. Others, such as the Waved Carpet, have a preference for six to nine year old coppice, whilst the Bordered Sallow Pyrrhia umbra, more typically a moth of open habitats, seemingly has a preference for low coppice regrowth within woodland. Other species are found more frequently in older coppice (e.g. up to about 20 years in age), and include Oak-tree Pug Eupithecia dodoneata, O. bractella and S. bifasciana.
"

This tells us that although the fritillaries will only use coppiced habitat in the first (usually three) years following a cut, all stages of regeneration thereafter support their own suites of seldom-noticed moths.

BWs, Neil


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