August 2009 Sightings

Discussion forum for sightings.
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Dave McCormick
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Re: August 2009 Sightings

Postby Dave McCormick » Sat Aug 29, 2009 10:35 pm

It is slowly getting cooler here, probably why I found this Red Admiral in my bedroom, landed on my head and I got a shot:
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Are Red Admirals starting to hibernate now? If so, if I find any hibernating species in my house, how would I look after them so they don't die of dry heat etc...? I have a breeding cage I use, would that be ok if I put them in there and sprayed them occationally with water and things for them to feed on?

Also found this fresh female Angle Shades moth, always liked this moth, fed it on sugar/water to attract it so I could photograph it:

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This shot of it feeding, makes it look like it has a "snout" or something :lol: :
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Cheers all,
My Website: My new website: http://daveslepidoptera.com/ - Last Update: 11/10/2011
My Nature videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/DynamixWarePro

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Pete Eeles
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Re: August 2009 Sightings

Postby Pete Eeles » Sat Aug 29, 2009 10:57 pm

Dave McCormick wrote:Are Red Admirals starting to hibernate now?


I'm not sure if Red Admirals hibernate as such and any adults (or other stages) that survive have probably hung on by the skin of their teeth :)

Dave McCormick wrote:if I find any hibernating species in my house, how would I look after them so they don't die of dry heat etc...?


Easy - let them out of the house. Preferably on a sunny day when they can warm up and find a more-suitable location to overwinter.

Dave McCormick wrote:I have a breeding cage I use, would that be ok if I put them in there and sprayed them occationally with water and things for them to feed on?


I doubt it. As I understand it, all hibernators need to go into a "deep sleep" so that their fat reserves aren't used up unnecessarily.

Cheers,

- Pete

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Jack Harrison
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Re: August 2009 Sightings

Postby Jack Harrison » Sun Aug 30, 2009 6:13 am

Beat this :) Still capable of strong flight

Jack
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Lee Hurrell
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Re: August 2009 Sightings

Postby Lee Hurrell » Sun Aug 30, 2009 12:18 pm

That's it - Jack wins the 'most worn and still flying' comp!!
Cheers
Lee
To butterfly meadows, chalk downlands and leafy glades; to summers eternal.

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Dave McCormick
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Re: August 2009 Sightings

Postby Dave McCormick » Sun Aug 30, 2009 1:31 pm

That's it - Jack wins the 'most worn and still flying' comp!!


Definatly a win for me!

Thanks Pete for advice...see any hibernating indoors, any sunny day, let them out.

The weather is turned to rain here, was hoping to get out, even for a little bit as I have been busy with other things, but the weather is not letting up the rain though so have to wait.
Cheers all,
My Website: My new website: http://daveslepidoptera.com/ - Last Update: 11/10/2011
My Nature videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/DynamixWarePro

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Neil Hulme
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Re: August 2009 Sightings

Postby Neil Hulme » Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:28 pm

Hi all,
Below is a recent posting to the BC Sussex website.

News for Saturday 29 August 2009: I returned to Steyning Rifle Range expecting to observe a downward trend in Brown Hairstreak numbers, but got a rather nice surprise! It was also a first visit for 'Purple Emperor buddy' Matthew Oates, Steve Meredith and Adrian Hoskins, who runs the fantastic website http://www.learnaboutbutterflies.com (see his 'Butterfly Diary' report) - all went away suitably impressed with the site. We saw a total of nine female Brown Hairstreaks, along with the 'usual suspects' including Wall and Clouded Yellow. There had clearly been a 'second wave' of emergence, as all nine of the Hairstreaks were in better condition than the 5 I saw during my last visit on 21 August. Some were very fresh and probably only a day or two old.

Note the characteristic 'half moon' notches in the forewing margins of the lower butterfly. These are caused when the insect shuffles backwards against blackthorn spines while egg-laying.
Neil

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