July 2017

Discussion forum for sightings.
Allan.W.
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Re: July 2017

Postby Allan.W. » Thu Jul 06, 2017 8:09 pm

Thanks for kind comment Pauline,a couple of other small obs; concerning PH,s ,I also scanned the Hairstreaks higher up in the Oak ,and every Hairstreak I observed ,appeared to be feeding from the Acorns,and none were feeding from the leaves (ie; Honeydew), and also tight against the tree
was a huge bank of Bramble ,admittedly past its best,but still plenty of flower,and in the hour plus that I was there ,I never saw one down on the bramble.......curious !
Today I,ve had short visits to several sights,one sight for a plant (Small flowered Catchfly. Silene Gallica ) Which I found, but not yet in flower,and was also pleased to find good numbers of Marbled Whites here as well,on Hothfield Common ,I managed to find 9 2nd brood Small Coppers,which I was hoping for,lots of Purple Hairs, here as well plus a single Marbled White, and the Comma I,ve posted which flew down into a deeply shaded,marshy area and fed for about ten minutes from the muddy water. At another sight near Sellindge, I found another 9 Coppers ,and yet more Marbles (22), and some cracking fresh Common Blues ,and another scarce plant (for Kent) Sneezewort (Achillea ptarmica),Actually there were hundreds of plants,but really pleased to see these as well. Thought I,d post a picture of yesterdays "homing" Hairstreak. !
Regards Allan.W.
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Vince Massimo
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Re: July 2017

Postby Vince Massimo » Thu Jul 06, 2017 9:57 pm

I decided that it was too hot to go out today, so sat in the garden to monitor any activity. A range of species flew through, but then a Red Admiral turned up and headed towards my potted nettle plants. It settled a few times, appearing to lay eggs, but when I checked the plants, not only were there approximately 4 Red Admiral eggs, but also a mid-sized Red Admiral larva and 6 other eggs which I identified as those of a Comma.

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Red Admiral ovum - Crawley, Sussex 6-July-2017

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Red Admiral larva - Crawley, Sussex 6-July-2017

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Comma ova - Crawley, Sussex 6-July-2017

The Comma eggs were noticeably smaller to the naked eye than those of the Red Admiral (there is a comparison image here: app.php/gallery/image/19402 taken by William), but the location on the leaf edge is another good indicator, as is counting the number of longitudinal keels (ridges). I will, of course, be monitoring them to check that the correct species emerges :)

Vince

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bugboy
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Re: July 2017

Postby bugboy » Fri Jul 07, 2017 2:41 pm

The first Grayling are emerging on Chobham Common. 3 males playfully hill topping today.
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millerd
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Re: July 2017

Postby millerd » Fri Jul 07, 2017 3:28 pm

...And they are also out at Dawney's Hill, Pirbright (just down the road).
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Dave

peterc
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Re: July 2017

Postby peterc » Fri Jul 07, 2017 4:25 pm

A trip to Hexton Chalk Pit yielded about 20 Chalkhill Blues (all males) between 0945 and 1015 am, but very few had their wings open even at this time in the morning - probably due to the heat. The usual common species were also present: Meadow Brown, RInglet, Gatekeeper, Marbled White, Small White, Small Skipper and Large Skipper in roughly descending order of abundance.

ATB

Peter
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ChalkhillBlue 6 Hexton CP 7Jul17.jpg
Chalkhill Blue underside (m) Hexton CP 7Jul17
ChalkhillBlue 10 Hexton CP 7Jul17.jpg
Chalkhill Blue upperside (m) Hexton CP 7Jul17

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NickC
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Re: July 2017

Postby NickC » Sat Jul 08, 2017 12:51 pm

I've just seen a fritillary in my garden for the first time. It didn't stay long and it didn't settle, so no chance of positively identifying it. It was a larger fritillary with deep orange uppersides and a black speckled pattern. I have seen silver-washed fritillaries in Devon, and this one didn't seem as large as those. That, and given that my location is north-east London very close to Epping Forest (mix of deciduous woodland and open grassland), means I guess it was most likely a dark green fritillary. Whatever it was though, I am delighted to have seen it in my garden. Hopefully it or its friends will visit again and allow some photographs to be taken!

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Jack Harrison
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Re: July 2017

Postby Jack Harrison » Sat Jul 08, 2017 3:08 pm

Nairnshire 8th July

My favourite Speckled Wood location in a roadside clearing had seven Speckled Woods sparring. On the few occasions one landed it was identified as a male.

In a rough patch in my garden, female Ringlet behaving in egg-laying mode (fluttering slowly over long grass sometimes disappearing into the vegetation) but laying not confirmed. Nice butterfly to have breeding in the garden especially when (it is thought) they didn't even occur in this area 20 years ago.

Jack

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Michaeljf
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Re: July 2017

Postby Michaeljf » Sat Jul 08, 2017 9:08 pm

Parc Penalta, Saturday 8th July

We visited Parc Penallta this afternoon (near to Ystrad Mynach). It was a site that Willrow introduced me too a few years back. It was very hot in Cardiff in the morning but up at Parc Penallta the skies were a lot cloudier though it was still quite warm and humid. The sun kept trying to peek through.

The Graylings have started to emerge there but not in great numbers yet. There were plenty of Ringlets, Meadow Browns, Small Skippers, Commas, Red Admirals, Small and Large Whites and the early emergence of the Gatekeepers there. There were also quite a few very healthy looking rabbits! The wildflowers that grow on the old coal tip grounds are quite beautiful and almost worth going for by themselves - I noticed that the wild Marjoram is just starting to flower there. Hopefully I'll return in a few weeks when the Graylings are more numerous. I'm off to Birkdale next weekend so it may be the end of July before I get a chance to return.

Michael

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A view across the slopes at Parc Penallta under cloudy skies.


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Perfectly disguised Graylings (note the rabbit droppings)..


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Fox and cubs - one of the many Wildflowers growing across the reclaimed ground


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Commas and Red Admirals were in good numbers this afternoon.

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Jack Harrison
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Re: July 2017

Postby Jack Harrison » Sun Jul 09, 2017 3:17 pm

Nairnshire 9th July

New garden tick, Large White (male and female). But mixed feelings as I grow nasturtiums which Large Whites caterpillars of course ruin.

This is my third summer here and first time I have seen Large Whites in the area. The are prominent butterflies and I would hardly have missed them had they been here. My suspicion is that they are migrants but with occasional periods of residency. Possibly an analogue with Continental Swallowtail near south coast of England.

Huge numbers of Ringlets, now beginning to look a little worn. Although I didn't make a formal count, on one patch of rough grass (Logie Steading) size 30 x 20 metres as many as 20 Ringlets visible at once.

Scotch Argus any day now.

Jack

Allan.W.
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Re: July 2017

Postby Allan.W. » Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:47 pm

Been out and about ,over the last few days,quick visits to lots of local sites ,here in mid-Kent,.Today we all went through to Dungeness where Lynne was going to try out her "new leg" (having just had a part Knee replacement),and very well she did to,we walked a short distance from the old lighthouse, and I,d normally (hope !) expect to see around 20 -30 Small Coppers on such a walk,but all I managed was 2 !
last year ,at around this date ,I counted 90+ and then gave up,but easily seeing 150+ in a two and a bit hour visit under complete cloud cover,this year the plants crunch under-foot its so dry ! I know Hoggers has noticed the same thing. While Lynne sat and rested a while ,I walked along the power station fence ,and noted a Hummingbird Hawk,which are always good to see ,and then another small moth ,got up ,and a first for me ,and a Dungeness speciality ,Sussex Emerald, funny I caught its very similar cousin Common Emerald in the trap this morning ! Also noted around 12 Common Blues (11 males ,1 female ) several Brown Args,a few worn Small Skippers ,Meadow Browns and fresh Gatekeepers. I,ve also posted another moth from my garden the tiny but stunning Pyrausta Purpuralis.
Regards Allan.W.
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NickC
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Re: July 2017

Postby NickC » Sun Jul 09, 2017 9:59 pm

Seen this afternoon near the southern end of Epping Forest were two meadow brown, one ringlet, two comma and a holly blue. Not rare of course, but lovely to see while out exploring on our bikes.
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Rosalyn
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Re: July 2017

Postby Rosalyn » Mon Jul 10, 2017 5:53 pm

Always a pleasure to see a Clouded Yellow as you can't factor it in to your butterflying day, weekend or even year sometimes. This one was bombing up and down for the hour I was visiting Woodwalton Marsh, Cambs 09.07.17
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badgerbob
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Re: July 2017

Postby badgerbob » Mon Jul 10, 2017 8:14 pm

A surprise of a Dingy Skipper yesterday at Seaford. Not often one of these can be seen on summer plants, this time a Viper's Bugloss.


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Dingy Skipper 9/7/2017 Seaford.

maverick
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Re: July 2017

Postby maverick » Mon Jul 10, 2017 8:19 pm

I've just spent the weekend in North Wales and I'm glad that I visited the Great Orm as the silver studded blues are back out and in there usual spot

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Charles Nicol
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Re: July 2017

Postby Charles Nicol » Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:11 pm

badgerbob wrote:A surprise of a Dingy Skipper yesterday at Seaford. Not often one of these can be seen on summer plants, this time a Viper's Bugloss.


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a charming photo badgerbob !

8)

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Jack Harrison
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Re: July 2017

Postby Jack Harrison » Tue Jul 11, 2017 2:21 am

That splendid combination of Dingy Skipper and blue Viper's Bugloss cannot occur very often - only when there is second brood Dingy Skipper.

Jack

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Mark Tutton
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Re: July 2017

Postby Mark Tutton » Tue Jul 11, 2017 8:48 am

I had to journey to Lyneham in Wiltshire yesterday to pick up our pooch which had been holidaying there with relatives, so I took the opportunity to stop off in Savernake. Having visited previously in the Autumn to look for larvae I thought I ought to see if I could catch up with the adults - with some success. There was only intermittent sunshine through the lunchtime period and I managed mostly brief views of five males along three oak drive and around the column - although one did an extended glide across the avenue about 20ft up. Good numbers of Purple Hairstreak were showing on the oaks and a lady showed me a picture of a nice Valezina she had taken on one of the rides. One of the chaps Emperor watching mentioned he and seen a female the day before so I made a note to return to do a bit of searching on the way home - well the dog needed a walk!
I returned to the North of the forest about 5:30pm and focused my search on a few bushes where I had found Larvae previously, and after 45mins and on the third bush which had perfect foliage, bingo a fresh green ova - very satisfying.
Kind Regards
Mark
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Fresh Purple Emperor egg
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peterc
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Re: July 2017

Postby peterc » Tue Jul 11, 2017 12:24 pm

In cloudy conditions I decided to go to the local woods this morning in search for Red Admiral larvae and/or tents on some nettle beds. I didn't find any but I found a nice Comma larva under a nettle leaf - perhaps in its final instar.

ATB

Peter
Attachments
Comma larva 6 Millennium Wood 11Jul17.jpg
Comma larva Millennium Wood 11Jul17
Comma larva 3 Millennium Wood 11Jul17.jpg
Comma larva Millennium Wood 11Jul17

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Jack Harrison
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Re: July 2017

Postby Jack Harrison » Tue Jul 11, 2017 2:33 pm

In this rather early season, I wonder if that Comma larva is the pale early summer hutchinsoni or the darker autumn form? My guess would be offspring of hutchinsoni. But will it be pale or dark adult? Does a Comma third brood ever occur?

Jack

peterc
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Re: July 2017

Postby peterc » Tue Jul 11, 2017 4:43 pm

Jack Harrison wrote:In this rather early season, I wonder if that Comma larva is the pale early summer hutchinsoni or the darker autumn form? My guess would be offspring of hutchinsoni. But will it be pale or dark adult? Does a Comma third brood ever occur?

Jack


Interesting comment, Jack. The spot where I found the larva is part of the one of the transects I walk. The first adult new-generation Comma (i.e. hutchinsoni) I saw was on 26 June (week 13) when I counted about a dozen so perhaps too soon for today's larva to be the offspring of the hutchinsoni form although I am aware that the development through the immature stages is much quicker than for the normal form.

ATB

Peter


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