EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

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Sylvie_h
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EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby Sylvie_h » Wed Aug 05, 2015 12:42 pm

Maybe this is a topic that has been raised before but I would like to know if anybody in this forum can tell me how reliable the integrating sensor cleaning system on newer Canon bodies is.
I believe some fluorine is being used in this system, if yes am I right to thing that this system will need to be updated/upgraded at some point in the future?
Thanks for your help.
Sylvie

ingleslenobel
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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby ingleslenobel » Tue Mar 15, 2016 11:30 am

No, the fluorine doesn't need to be replaced - it's just a coating designed to repel sensor dust. The system is ultrasonic - bottom line, it tries to shake the dust off with ultrasonic vibrations. Works a lot of the time and definitely better than nothing, but not infallable. If you get sticky sensor dust you may still need to deal with it yourself or have it cleaned professionally. It's a nervy business cleaning your sensor but perfectly doable - the best I found was eclipse liquid and sensor swabs, closely followed by a sensor gel kit. I also used an arctic butterfly but that didn't work so well for me.

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Pete Eeles
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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby Pete Eeles » Tue Mar 15, 2016 11:46 am

I haven't had to have my Canon 7D sensor cleaned in over 3 years, so I'm a big fan of the mechanism. If I ever did need it cleaned (and I probably should get it cleaned at least every year ... the occasional dust spot does materialise now and again), then I would get it done professionally. This is partly because I once destroyed a Canon 10D sensor with a dry swab mechanism that clearly didn't work!

Cheers,

- Pete

Sylvie_h
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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby Sylvie_h » Tue Mar 22, 2016 2:00 pm

Thank you for your reply.

The best thing to avoid having to clean the sensor would be to leave the same lens attached to the body all the time but this would not be convenient as depending on what subject I photograph, I need a different lens. I have not had any problems yet with sensor dust as my camera is brand new but it does not have the integrated sensor cleaning and I will have to do it in the future, I am dreading this already. I will start using the blower first and try to avoid any cleansing fluid or swabs until I get confident that I can do it.....
I do have the function of 'dust delete data' and I believe that this is handled by the software in the camera. Can anybody tell me how efficient this is ?

Thanks for your help.
Sylvie

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Gruditch
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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby Gruditch » Sun Apr 03, 2016 3:42 pm

Hi Sylvie,

I wouldn't fuss too much about it. I've had my 5D MK 2 since 2009, I've had the sensor cleaned just once. My 7D, that I've had since 2010, has never been cleaned. I have one or two dust spots now on the 5D MK2. But they only show up on blue sky's or white clouds, so I just clone them out.

Regards Gary

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Roger Gibbons
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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby Roger Gibbons » Sun Apr 03, 2016 7:28 pm

Sylvie,

Two other thoughts:
1. You can use a "Stamp Tool" in the Canon software to eliminate any dust spots. I had a few in 2008 and this worked very well, with a bit of practice.
2. Canon offer a sensor clean for about £30 (maybe more as I last did this about five years ago). It was convenient for me as I live about ten miles from Canon in Elstree so I could take it in and collect it, but it is also possible to post the camera to them (albeit a bit more tedious).

Gary's advice is very good in my experience. As long as you don't change lenses in a dusty environment, there shouldn't be a problem.

However, there are instructions for a self sensor clean in the handbook. I tried this and made it immeasurably worse (maybe just my lack of technique), but I had to send the camera to Canon in Marseille at a cost of 120 euros, so I don't recommend that unless you are really confident.

Roger

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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby Chris Jackson » Sun Apr 03, 2016 7:54 pm

Sylvie_h wrote: .... The best thing to avoid having to clean the sensor would be to leave the same lens attached to the body all the time .... I need a different lens. Sylvie


Hi Sylvie,
To avoid the dust problem, one option IS to leave your main (most important / most useful) lens on your DSLR and to use a secondary camera for other views.
This is what I'm doing. I am currently going through a phase where I keep my trusty Panasonic FZ150 bridge available (idot proof), while trying out a new Nikon D5200 with 70 - 300 telephoto / macro lens (which is not idot proof) during the learning curve. This way I am spared the trouble of lens changes in the field.
Why make life more complicated than it already is until you get to a stage where you feel at ease.

I try and take a proof shot in telephoto mode with the Nikon (at a few meters, or tens of meters distance), all the time moving slowly forwards. When I'm sure I've got my proof shots, I whip out the FZ150 and move into "fieldcraft" mode still moving closer and closer. When I'm happy that I've got usable photos (with depth of field), I can then switch back to the Nikon and try the macro mode. There are a lot of "ifs" in all that.

This has the added advantage of walking around overladen with 2 cameras, looking like a pro to unsuspecting onlookers :oops:

(I have followed your previous posts, Sylvie, elsewhere, concerning depth of field, and I feel your pain. This is another reason why I'm not about to let go of my FZ150 because it takes care of depth of field all by itself).

Good luck,
Chris
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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby MikeOxon » Tue Apr 05, 2016 10:23 am

Chris Jackson wrote:To avoid the dust problem, one option IS to leave your main (most important / most useful) lens on your DSLR and to use a secondary camera for other views.


Up to a point - but you can end up missing out on the benefits of having an interchangeable lens camera! It's always wise, however, to choose where and when to change lenses, to minimise the risk of dust blowing into the camera body.

I agree, though, that a second camera is great for general shots, while a more specialist lens is on the main camera. I often use my iPhone for habitat shots, while pursuing butterflies with a macro lens, for example.

Mike

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Gruditch
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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby Gruditch » Tue Apr 05, 2016 6:22 pm

I agree with Mike, just sticking to one lens, is kind of nullifying the point of having an interchangeable lens system. I've changed lenses in rain, snow, high winds, if I thought it could get me a better shot, I would change lenses in a sand storm.

Just last week, I was doing a shot of a picturesque little cottage, with a mountain in the background. I started with a full frame camera, and wide angle lens. But the mountain appeared too small in the background. By the time I had finished, I had used two camera bodies, with three lenses, six lens changes in all. Always use the best lens for the job, even if you can't decide which one it is :wink:

Regards Gary

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Re: EOS Integrating sensor cleaning system

Postby Sylvie_h » Wed Apr 13, 2016 1:24 pm

Thank you all for your suggestions and help. I've just returned from South East Spain where it was very dusty (and windy)- I had to decide which lens to use for the day before going out. I would not take the chance of damaging the sensor in such an environment. This is the best option for me at the moment until I get confident that I can change the lens in the field. I thought about a second body but that would be too heavy to carry around: I do a lot of walking and scrambling over rocks so this is not an option for me right now.

Roger, I don't feel confident about using the blower on the sensor as Canon suggest in the instruction manual.... I feel that I could end up doing more damage than good. Brave of you to send your lens to Marseilles for a clean up.... I don't think I would have taken the risk having lost a few items with the french post office. When I complained at the Nice post Office they told me with a gallic shrug : 'well what can we do? We know that there are thieves within the post office, the problem is that we can't catch them !' .... From that day I stopped using them.
Sylvie


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