Evolution in process

User avatar
bugboy
Posts: 2212
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2014 6:29 pm
Location: London

Evolution in process

Postby bugboy » Mon Dec 01, 2014 9:37 pm

Has anyone ever pondered/speculated/ruminated that perhaps what we have in the Cryptic Wood White is a newly evolved (as in geological time) species adapting to a changing environment? It would do a lot to explain the odd distribution. As any good biologist knows, evolution is a constantly moving process so it makes sense that in isolated pockets genetic experimentation which results in a form that is better adapted to a changing environment would do better than it's declining predessor. Just some thoughts but in my mind it all makes complete sense!
Some addictions are good for the soul!

User avatar
Padfield
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 6776
Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2006 10:19 pm
Location: Switzerland
Contact:

Re: Evolution in process

Postby Padfield » Mon Dec 01, 2014 9:59 pm

The evidence (according to Dinca et al.) seems to be that historically juvernica was the predominant species in most of Europe and Asia, with sinapis and reali restricted to the south-west. Subsequently, sinapis moved north and east into the rest of Europe, while reali remained concentrated in the south-west. See http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/15889380/2046998143/name/Dinca+et+al+2011_juvernica.pdf. If that is right, your suggestion is probably wrong - but science bends and dogma breaks, as they say ... New evidence might change the orthodoxy.

Guy

PS - I forgot to say, welcome to UK Butterflies!
Guy's Butterflies: http://www.guypadfield.com

User avatar
Pete Eeles
Administrator & Stock Contributor
Administrator & Stock Contributor
Posts: 6168
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 6:10 pm
Location: Thatcham, Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Evolution in process

Postby Pete Eeles » Mon Dec 01, 2014 10:06 pm

And welcome from me too, bugboy!

My understanding is the same as Guy's, and the big question for me - is why did juvernica die out on the British mainland, given that no evidence of this species has turned up in historic British collections?

Cheers,

- Pete

User avatar
bugboy
Posts: 2212
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2014 6:29 pm
Location: London

Re: Evolution in process

Postby bugboy » Mon Dec 01, 2014 10:12 pm

Thanks for the reply, I'll be completely honest and admit a lot of that article goes over my head but at least now I know it is being studied. I'd have been extremely surprised had it not been.

thanks for the welcome :)
Some addictions are good for the soul!

User avatar
David M
Posts: 7872
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:17 pm
Location: South Wales

Re: Evolution in process

Postby David M » Mon Dec 01, 2014 10:18 pm

Pete Eeles wrote:why did juvernica die out on the British mainland, given that no evidence of this species has turned up in historic British collections?


I lose sleep over this too! How can a species have established itself in Ireland after the last ice age without any evidence of it colonising the British mainland as well?

I still believe there's considerable mileage in this phenomenon (don't forget, quarter of a century ago it was commonly accepted that Irish Wood Whites were sinapis and by some miracle they had become far more common and widespread in Ireland than in Britain).

User avatar
Matsukaze
Posts: 1223
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:18 pm
Location: North Somerset

Re: Evolution in process

Postby Matsukaze » Tue Dec 02, 2014 12:21 am


User avatar
David M
Posts: 7872
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:17 pm
Location: South Wales

Re: Evolution in process

Postby David M » Tue Dec 02, 2014 9:48 am

That's an interesting article, Matsukaze, but why are Cryptic Wood Whites widespread throughout Ireland?


Return to “Cryptic Wood White”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest