Art Frames

This forum contains a topic per member, each representing a personal diary.
User avatar
Wurzel
Stock Contributor
Stock Contributor
Posts: 5632
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 5:44 pm
Location: Salisbury
Contact:

Re: Art Frames

Postby Wurzel » Thu Aug 10, 2017 8:56 pm

A cracking shot Peter, I especially like the way you've caught the upturn on the antennae :D :mrgreen:

Have a goodun

Wurzel

Art Frames
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 12:59 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby Art Frames » Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:48 pm

Our summer holiday to France this year was a little later than previous years and also not as far south. So my expectations were not overly optimistic.

In preparation I had prepared a list of what was likely to be on the wing in the Dordogne in August together with a few recommended locations from a local expert. It was a list with some interesting species on there but I tried to keep my enthusiasm in check. As we left the UK it was raining but the weather forecast for the Dordogne was 30+ for the whole week (with some showers on the two day journey down). Each year I go to France I say we can't keep doing these huge distances (and then have such a great time change my mind... :D ). It is a compulsion and a dilemma. This year I booked us into two Chateau B&Bs on the way down, and one on the race homewards (mistake should have done two back as well).

Our holiday was staying in a small pretty village surrounded by walks into lovely countryside. There was the traditional Dordogne fare of caves and canoes should we have wished it, but we didn't. We stick to peace and rural solitude.

The weather was initially OK 30-34, but on some days the temperature hit 38 degrees and that tended to keep even mad dogs inside for a few hours. It seems wrong to moan but our house was at the top of a hill and I am built for comfort, not speed.

So I have a few pictures to share and one video. I'll do my best at uploading them with a few comments to see if I can share what we saw just a couple of weeks ago...(seems like last year! :shock: )

There were many hundreds of fritillaries. Biggest numbers were of - Silver-washed Frits
ImageSilver-washed Fritillary, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Weaver's Frits
ImageWeaver's Fritillary - Boloria dia, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
ImageViolet (or Weaver's) Fritillary - Boloria dia - underside by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

A good few Meadow Frits
ImageMeadow Fritillary - Melitaea parthenoides, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Pearls
ImagePearl-bordered Fritillary by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

and Knapweed
ImageKnapweed Fritillary - Melitaea phoebe by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
ImageKnapweed Fritillary - Melitaea phoebe by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Sometimes together...
ImageSilver-washed and Knapweed Fritillaries sharing flowers. by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

One of my personal favourites the Queen of Spain Frits
ImageQueen of Spain Fritillary, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
ImageQueen of Spain Fritillary, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

As you can see most were in pretty good condition and most of these pictures were taken in quite unremarkable meadows and waste land.That is the one thing that makes France a personal joy to me - the amount of good open ground there is teeming with butterflies. There were the 'dead' areas probably sprayed and farmed the 'modern' way but plenty of old and untouched meadow and scrub to walk through full of insect life. I wish we had it in Northants!

One of the highlights for me were the Lesser Purple Emperors. Both the dark and orange (Clytie) forms. I saw more than I could photograph as they were quite active in the heat and often high unless there was something smelly to bring them down. I was a partial draw with one enjoying some sweat (sorry no pictures!)

ImageLesser Purple Emperor - Aparatura ilia (form Clytie) by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
ImageLesser Purple Emperor - Aparatura ilia (form Clytie) by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

ImageLesser Purple Emperor- Aparatura ilia by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
ImageLesser Purple Emperor- Aparatura ilia by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
ImageLesser Purple Emperor- Aparatura ilia by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Alongside the LPE's were Southern White Admirals and Maps.
ImageSouthern White Admiral - Liminenitis reducta by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
ImageMap butterfly second brood (dark form) by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Another highlight was to see a number of Dryads. A butterfly I struggle to depict well. It is always ungainly and clumsy in landing. I was actually fairly pleased with this shot... :D
ImageDryad - Minois dryas, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

This one displaying the more usual ragged and torn specimen. But they are still lovely :D
ImageDryad - Minois dryas, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Speaking of ragged and torn. Here was a late surviving Large Blue. I had hoped for better but am glad I kept this shot as it was my only sighting.
ImageLarge Blue - Maculinea arion, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

But some specimens were in absolutely super condition. Including this Sooty Copper
ImageSooty Copper - Lycaena tityrus by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

And this Small Copper
ImageSmall Copper by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Dozens of Adonis Blues
ImageAdonis blue - France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Hundreds of Holly Blues
ImageHolly Blue. by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
ImageHolly Blue - Celastrina argiolus by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Berger's Clouded Yellow
ImageBerger' Clouded Yellow - Coleus alfacariensis, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

The one Swallowtail that slowed down.... :lol:
ImageSwallowtail - Papilio machaon, France by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

And I'll stop part one with a picture which I love as a picture... :D . Just shows what good light can do for a photo and why artists love the European light...

ImagePeacock on Lavender by Peter Willmott, on Flickr
Peter - Art Frames
A few photos on Flickr

User avatar
Wurzel
Stock Contributor
Stock Contributor
Posts: 5632
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 5:44 pm
Location: Salisbury
Contact:

Re: Art Frames

Postby Wurzel » Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:17 pm

Fantastic shots as per usual Peter especially the Knapweed and Silver-washed side by side :D :mrgreen:

Have a goodun

Wurzel

User avatar
David M
Posts: 7644
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:17 pm
Location: South Wales

Re: Art Frames

Postby David M » Tue Sep 12, 2017 6:17 am

Tremendous, Peter. I shall thoroughly look forward to seeing further images from your trip (Dryad and Map are particularly appealing from your first selection).

User avatar
Goldie M
Posts: 3063
Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2009 3:05 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby Goldie M » Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:22 am

Great shot's Peter, especially the Swallow Tail and the size of the shot's make them even more impressive :D Goldie :D

trevor
Posts: 1477
Joined: Thu Sep 25, 2014 6:31 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby trevor » Thu Sep 14, 2017 6:53 am

Classic images once again, Peter. Keep em' coming.
I particularly like the Southern White Admiral.

Trevor.

Art Frames
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 12:59 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby Art Frames » Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:33 pm

Thank you Trevor, Goldie M, David M and Wurzel, for those kind comments. I am thinking I might put these pictures and especially the video elsewhere as well as here as it may have wider interest (I can't imagine many people looking at my diary... :lol: ). If that breaks rules then I apologise.

During the week I saw three different Graylings: Tree Grayling - Hipparchia statilinus, Great-banded Grayling - Brintesia circe and a lot of Woodland Grayling - Hipparchia fagi. I had seen Great-bandeds before many times but not certain of the others. I believe I am now better at IDing the u/s - but you may believe otherwise :shock: please tell me...

Image
Tree Grayling - Hipparchia statilinus, France

Image
Great-banded Grayling - Brintesia circe

Image
Woodland Grayling - Hipparchia fagi

But on the last day I began to see this beautiful and elaborate courtship dance. I saw three pairs of Woodland Graylings doing it and so in addition to a few photos I shot some video which I encourage you to look at as it is so delicate and touching.

Image
Pair of Woodland Graylings

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0H2c7kc0Eo

Hope you enjoy this too.
Peter - Art Frames
A few photos on Flickr

User avatar
bugboy
Posts: 2092
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2014 6:29 pm
Location: London

Re: Art Frames

Postby bugboy » Thu Sep 14, 2017 6:28 pm

Superb couple of reports Peter. I love that Peacock, it's almost 3D! The video is fascinating as well, the way the males force the females antennae onto they're scent patches, very persistent little sods aren't they :lol: !
Some addictions are good for the soul!

User avatar
Wurzel
Stock Contributor
Stock Contributor
Posts: 5632
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 5:44 pm
Location: Salisbury
Contact:

Re: Art Frames

Postby Wurzel » Thu Sep 14, 2017 8:02 pm

Cracking set of Graylings - they seem quite easy to differentiate - on a tree = Tree Grayling, massive band across wings = Great-banded etc :wink: The last shot of the pair is a beaut I've not got shots like that of our common or garden Grayling :D :mrgreen:

Have a goodun

Wurzel

User avatar
David M
Posts: 7644
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:17 pm
Location: South Wales

Re: Art Frames

Postby David M » Thu Sep 14, 2017 8:43 pm

Nice selection there, Peter. Going later in the summer gives you the opportunity to see a wider variety of Graylings. It's one family I tend to see a restricted range of given the time of year I generally visit France.

One of these days I'll shake of the yoke of work and spend a full 6 months in southern Europe and hopefully get to see more of these fascinating insects.

Art Frames
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 12:59 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby Art Frames » Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:33 am

Wurzel wrote:Cracking set of Graylings - they seem quite easy to differentiate - on a tree = Tree Grayling, massive band across wings = Great-banded etc :wink: The last shot of the pair is a beaut I've not got shots like that of our common or garden Grayling :D :mrgreen:

Have a goodun

Wurzel


Hi Wurzel,

Love the simplicity of your technique, I must take you with me another time as it would stop me poring over books for hours and there'd be more time for drinking the vino. :lol:

But I presents another problem. I need a new book as the old ones don't even mention the Tarmac Grayling and I think there is definitely a possibility of dividing Tree Grayling into a subspecies called Post Grayling as well.

And I'd love to see pictures of your Garden Grayling. I am building a mental picture of resplendent gardens at Wurzel Towers full of exotic fauna. :wink:

cheers

peter
Peter - Art Frames
A few photos on Flickr

Art Frames
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 12:59 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby Art Frames » Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:37 am

bugboy wrote:Superb couple of reports Peter. I love that Peacock, it's almost 3D! The video is fascinating as well, the way the males force the females antennae onto they're scent patches, very persistent little sods aren't they :lol: !


Thanks Bugboy. The peacock is a huge favourite of mine. I think the blue fringing makes the effect of pulling it away from the background. never seen that edge before. But it is good at a large size.

cheers

peter
Peter - Art Frames
A few photos on Flickr

Art Frames
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 12:59 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby Art Frames » Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:46 am

David M wrote:Nice selection there, Peter. Going later in the summer gives you the opportunity to see a wider variety of Graylings. It's one family I tend to see a restricted range of given the time of year I generally visit France.

One of these days I'll shake of the yoke of work and spend a full 6 months in southern Europe and hopefully get to see more of these fascinating insects.


Thank you David. I have settled upon taking one organised trip and one personal trip a year (but more and longer sounds good too). I do appreciate the organised trips - the reports of your trip this year demonstrate all of the reasons why. A large number of butterflies, excellent local knowledge, help with the ID work. I've put it on my list!

In contrast my own trips give me the chance for personal exploration and time to enjoy the less dramatic and less spectacular as well as occasionally finding a really good butterfly. I do wonder what it would be like living in some of the places we visit. So a longer break might be good for me too.

peter
Peter - Art Frames
A few photos on Flickr

User avatar
David M
Posts: 7644
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:17 pm
Location: South Wales

Re: Art Frames

Postby David M » Fri Sep 15, 2017 6:08 pm

Art Frames wrote:
In contrast my own trips give me the chance for personal exploration and time to enjoy the less dramatic and less spectacular as well as occasionally finding a really good butterfly. I do wonder what it would be like living in some of the places we visit. So a longer break might be good for me too.



Yes. I know exactly what you mean, Peter. Much as I enjoy the guided trips, I'm never happier than when pottering about on my own going wherever my senses take me.

Art Frames
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 12:59 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby Art Frames » Sat Sep 16, 2017 3:52 pm

This one shot of a Clouded yellow was taken in the wild garden of a chateau B&B we stayed in on the way back home. The owner was trying for an English country garden style. But I wish my Cosmos had such visitors. :D

Image
Clouded Yellow on a Cosmos flower
Peter - Art Frames
A few photos on Flickr

trevor
Posts: 1477
Joined: Thu Sep 25, 2014 6:31 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby trevor » Sat Sep 16, 2017 4:19 pm

A truly gorgeous shot, Peter.

User avatar
Wurzel
Stock Contributor
Stock Contributor
Posts: 5632
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 5:44 pm
Location: Salisbury
Contact:

Re: Art Frames

Postby Wurzel » Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:32 pm

Indeed Trevor it is a beaut of a shot - the colours are truly astounding :D :mrgreen:

Have a goodun

Wurzel

User avatar
David M
Posts: 7644
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:17 pm
Location: South Wales

Re: Art Frames

Postby David M » Sun Sep 17, 2017 8:21 pm

Beautiful contrast, Peter. Yes, it'd be nice if crocea popped up in the UK as regularly as it does in France.

Art Frames
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 12:59 pm

Re: Art Frames

Postby Art Frames » Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:47 am

I have a few more from France, which I might upload....but I actually had a few hours yesterday in (relative) warmth and sunshine. Well in comparison with the damp and cold of the past two weeks... So I treated myself to a walk round Summer Leys reserve, which is local and good for Autumnal scenes. Within the limitations of the fauna of Northamptonshire it was a good day...(our Walls are all stone or brick! Trevor... :( )

One Small Copper. I must have taken 30 pictures and the best shots were of the underside...
Image

A single Red Admiral, but strongly marked and in a nice place...
Image

Commas were there in good numbers and in lovely condition...posing for me every few yards
Image
Image
Image

Speckled Woods similarly in good numbers but a bit patchy, so I post this one as it is better shape...
Image

This Migrant Hawker Dragonfly was also enjoying the day...
Image

As a final shot...having seen just one Red Admiral there have been dozens more at home on the Ivy, but not yesterday as it was heaving with wasps..
Image
Peter - Art Frames
A few photos on Flickr

User avatar
Wurzel
Stock Contributor
Stock Contributor
Posts: 5632
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 5:44 pm
Location: Salisbury
Contact:

Re: Art Frames

Postby Wurzel » Wed Sep 20, 2017 9:10 am

Beautiful set of shots Peter, that first one in particular really allows you to appreciate the subtlety of the Small Copper underside in comparison to the almost brash topside :D

Have a goodun

Wurzel


Return to “Personal Diaries”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest