Tony Moore

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Sun May 21, 2017 2:20 pm

My last day dawned fine and sunny, and after my mandatory veg curry, I mooched off down the track. First 'newbie' was a very pale 'Blue':
1-Pale Blue 1.jpg

This, I'm now sure is the Albocaeruean Blue Udara albocaerulea following observations by Guy ( to whom many thanks ).The dark margins and light central patches of the forewings are just apparent through the undersides Next, a couple of Satirids. The Pallid Argus ( Callerebia scanda ). The beautifully marked pale under hindwing is very obvious in flight:
Pallid Argus (Callerebia scanda).jpg

Then a single Himalayan Newar Three-ring ( Ypthima newara ):
Himalayan Newar Three-ring  (Ypthima newara).jpg


Later on, I disturbed a butterfly which appeared to be deep shining blue black as it flew around my legs. When it settled, it was a gorgeous golden brown! It proved to be a Blue Forester ( Lethe scanda ):
Blue Forester (Lethe scanda).jpg


From the photograph alone, one might wonder why it was called 'Blue'.

My day finished with (I think) the brown form of the Pale Blue Pansy ( Junonia orythia swinhoei ) - not much of a shot, but my only chance:
Pale Blue Pansy (Junonia orythia swinhoei).jpg


I thought that was me finished as my transport back to Guwahati was coming at 7 a.m. the next day. It tipped with rain all night and on the way down, the next day there was a massive landslip and the road was all but obliterated:
1-DSC09116_edited-1.jpg


The road guys had been working through the night, but we were still held up for 50 mins. This proved to be a blessing in disguise as there was lots of lovely fresh damp sand about. The camera was quickly out as there were several Chestnut Tigers ( Parantica sita ) floating around. This has to be the most elegant and beautiful of the 'Tigers' with the chestnut suffusion on the hindwings. Unfortunately, they were very jumpy and this was the best that I could do (no open wing shot gggrrh!):
Chestnut Tiger (Parantica sita).jpg


I then nearly stepped on a stunning fresh Tabby ( Pseudergolis wedah ):
Tabby (Pseudergolis wedah).jpg


And then to crown it all, a Common Windmill ( Byasa polyeuctes ) dropped down for a salt lunch:
Common Windmill(Byasa polyeuctes).jpg



Three that I didn't expect, put a real gloss on a very interesting holiday.

I came within a whisker of missing my flight from Delhi – but that's another story...

Tony M.
Last edited by Tony Moore on Tue May 23, 2017 5:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Padfield
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Padfield » Mon May 22, 2017 7:49 pm

Hi Tony. I'd suggest Udara albocaerulea for your first blue, both because of the submarginal markings (only spots, no crescents) and your description of it as 'very pale'.

Guy
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David M
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby David M » Mon May 22, 2017 8:18 pm

You certainly made the most of your enforced delay, Tony.

The first Blue looks superficially like our own Holly Blue, but God alone knows how many similar species are present in that paradise you visited.

I think I'd feel overwhelmed being assaulted by so many different types of unfamiliar butterflies. Well done for having the courage to get out to a place few of us visit.

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Mon May 22, 2017 8:40 pm

Thanks, Guy for the ID, which certainly looks good on the Indian site. It was the photograph which caused to most trouble with the guys from Singapore, whose expertise I frequently use with tropical stuff. No one even offered an opinion.
This butterflying is a hell of a compulsive interest - I'm already thinking of a return trip next year - if I should live so long, already... :shock:

Tony.

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Re: Tony Moore

Postby David M » Mon May 22, 2017 8:45 pm

Tony Moore wrote:..if I should live so long, already...


I think you're being a bit premature there, Tony...especially having met you!! :)

That said, at least you'd be one of the very few who could genuinely say you died happy!! If I collapse in the French Alps one day I won't feel in the least cheated. I can't think of a better way to go....

....sorry for being morbid....but you started it! :D

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Mon May 22, 2017 10:52 pm

Cardiac arrest in the Alps is OK, but I still hanker after being shot in bed by a jealous husband :lol: :lol: :lol:

T.

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Tony Moore
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Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:22 pm

Just back from a few days on Ischia, one of the unsung jewels of the Mediterranean. Flowers everywhere, but despite several treks into the hills, surprisingly few butterfly species :( . The commonest by far was Wall Brown, with dozens being seen in many places. It reminded me of my childhood when WB was also the commonest species where I was in the MIdlands (and still am - ggrrr! Lord knows why?). I did see a couple of Ilex Hairstreaks - I think...
1-DSC09133_edited-1.jpg
.

Otherwise, there were a few Specklies', several Cleopatras, Common Blues and Swallowtail and Scarce ST. This Swallowtail was determinedly feeding in quite a strong breeze and this was the best I could do:

2-Ischia 2.jpg


So, the butterflies were disappointing, but the pizza and the 'polpo' were great :mrgreen: .

Tony M.

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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Pauline » Fri Jun 23, 2017 5:55 pm

Tony Moore wrote:Cardiac arrest in the Alps is OK, but I still hanker after being shot in bed by a jealous husband :lol: :lol: :lol:


Keep up the banter guys - it's putting a smile on my face :D Loving your sense of humour.

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David M
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby David M » Fri Jun 23, 2017 10:31 pm

Pizza and Polpo with accompanying Swallowtails is even better, Tony!

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Sat Jun 24, 2017 10:05 am

Thanks, Pauline, for your approbation :D .

We have to be careful not to turn UKB into Dave and Tone's Laugh-in. (For those old enough to remember Rowan and Martin!). :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Tony M.

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Tony Moore
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Black Hairstreak

Postby Tony Moore » Tue Jun 27, 2017 1:09 pm

After several years of unsuccessful searching, I finally found a Black Hairstreak egg yesterday :D .
2-2017-06-27-12.42.36 ZS PMax.jpg


Tony M.

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Tony Moore
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Re: Black?? Hairstreak

Postby Tony Moore » Tue Jun 27, 2017 9:11 pm

Sorry, Guys,

Looks like wishful thinking on my part :oops: . Current thinking is that it is an unhatched Brown Hairstreak egg from last year. Any thoughts, anyone?

Tony M.

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Pete Eeles
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Pete Eeles » Wed Jul 05, 2017 7:25 pm

Looks good for a Brown Hairstreak egg to me ... definitely not Black Hairstreak.

Cheers,

- Pete

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Tony Moore
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Re: Mayrhofen

Postby Tony Moore » Tue Aug 01, 2017 5:28 pm

Just back from a short 'Alps fix' in Mayrhofen,where I saw not one piece of litter during my stay – what a pleasant change after fast-food Britain.
It is a beautiful area with acres of flowery meadows, but unfortunately, almost all are seeded and cordoned off, so that access to good butterfly areas is problematic.
On my first day, I took a bus up the Stilluptal valley, where there is a dam and artificial lake. I had been informed by our rep that 500 species of butterfly were to be found in this valley! When I tried to disabuse her, suggesting that there are not that number in the whole of Europe, she would brook no argument as it was 'on the internet'...
There was a likely looking strip of ground between the road and the lake and this produced the first butterflies. There were some very fresh Silver-washed Frits:
1-SWF 1.jpg


2-SWF 3.jpg


I was encouraged by the sight of a fresh Scarce Copper, an Apollo in the distance and the first of the many confusing Erebias to be found there. All pix were taken between 1000 and 2000 mt. Any ID suggestions that I make are distinctly tentative, and expert feedback would be very welcome.
One of the big problems that I find with Erebias is getting an upper and lower shot of the same butterfly. These are upper and under of (I think) Arran Brown, the commonest of the Erebias in the area:
3-Arran Brown_edited-1.jpg

4-Arran Brown u.jpg


Two others from the same time – suggestions please – I have no idea:
5-Y-s Ringlet.jpg


6-Mystery Ringlet 3.jpg



The next two days tipped with rain most of the time and looking at the forecast seemed likely to continue for the week – not a happy prospect. However, day four dawned bright and clear and I set off by bus for the Hintertux Glacier for what was to be my best day.
TBC...

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David M
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby David M » Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:14 pm

I'm not an expert on erebia by any means, Tony, but your last specimen has a look of Lesser Mountain Ringlet to me, and I have seen this species in Austria before at a similar time of year.

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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Padfield » Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:48 pm

Yes - the last one does look like melampus. The hint of the extra spot towards the apex of the forewing suggests sudetica but the general sweep of the spots on forewing and hindwing counts against that, I think. The hindwing spots are too irregular in size. I imagine the previous one is alberganus.

Guy
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby David M » Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:54 pm

Your montane butterfly eye is SO much keener than mine, Guy.

Yes, of course, Almond-Eyed is likely for the first of those latter two - you'd have thought I'd be better attuned having just seen hundreds of them in the French Alps!!! :(

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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Roger Gibbons » Tue Aug 01, 2017 9:37 pm

I haven't looked in detail, but my instinct is euryale for the first two (on the basis of the underside) and manto for the third.

Roger

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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Padfield » Tue Aug 01, 2017 9:51 pm

Funnily enough, my immediate instinct on shape and appearance was manto for that one, but I've never seen manto with pupils on the hindwing like that - hence my non-committal, 'I imagine it's alberganus'. However, Leraut has examples from Austria with pupils. So I'm inclined to agree with Roger. The wingshape doesn't look very alberganus. An underside would clear it up ...

Guy
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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:09 pm

Thank you all so much for the input :D . There were good numbers of what I thought might be manto around. They drop into the undergrowth at the least provocation. Is this one? :

1-Y-s Ringlet 3.jpg


Tony M.


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