Tony Moore

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Sun Jan 28, 2018 6:13 pm

Many thanks, Guy, for the suggestions and kind remarks. I'm sure you are right (as usual :D ). The Junonia was the only specimen I saw and did not see the open wings. The white rectangle at the underwing costa looks pretty distinctive for J. hedonia - my suggestion was a hopeful stab in the dark. With regards to the 'leaf', I'm not sure at all :oops:, although Kallima looks a better bet. Dolleschallia was suggested on the Borneo Butts website, but I'm waiting to hear back from my friend, who lured it, for a definite ID.

Tony.

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:55 pm

Guy,

I have now heard back from Sabah and, of course, you were spot on! It was the Malayan Oakleaf (Kalima limborgi boxtoni). The larva below was (Doleschallia). I have edited the post with corrections. Many thanks for your expert input :D .

Tony.

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David M
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby David M » Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:07 pm

Fantastic report, Tony. Those colours brightened up the month of January for me. Many thanks!

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Tue Jan 30, 2018 4:45 pm

Thanks, David - they brightened my winter, too :D :D .

I'm surprised that no one has commented on the 'Butterfly Moth', which seemed a most bizarre insect to me. I understand from my companion that they are rarely seen, especially in such smart condition.

T.

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bugboy
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby bugboy » Tue Jan 30, 2018 6:25 pm

Tony Moore wrote:Thanks, David - they brightened my winter, too :D :D .

I'm surprised that no one has commented on the 'Butterfly Moth', which seemed a most bizarre insect to me. I understand from my companion that they are rarely seen, especially in such smart condition.

T.


Can't say I've ever heard of them, although I'd certainly be fooled if I saw one. There doesn't seem to be a lot of info online about them either, wikipedia lists 27 species in the genus though. I have however heard of the Moth Butterfly Liphyra brassolis, one of the largest Lycids and has a lifecycle very similar to the Large Blue.

Also, I'd be over the moon with that brookiana image :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: You really do get around a bit!
Some addictions are good for the soul!

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David M
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby David M » Tue Jan 30, 2018 9:09 pm

Tony Moore wrote:I'm surprised that no one has commented on the 'Butterfly Moth', which seemed a most bizarre insect to me. I understand from my companion that they are rarely seen, especially in such smart condition.


Well Tony, we live and learn.

I had no idea that moths could mimic butterflies like this species does and, like you, I have no answer as to why this should be.

I always feel Mother Shiptons are honorary butterflies, but your individual takes this to a different level.

How many more like this are around without we enthusiasts knowing?

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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Padfield » Tue Jan 30, 2018 9:32 pm

David M wrote:I had no idea that moths could mimic butterflies like this species does and, like you, I have no answer as to why this should be.


There's a surprising amount of it about!

Compare this moth (Castnia cononia) ...

Image
(from http://www.theinsectcollector.com/acatalog/info-12498.html)

... with this Ithomiid butterfly:

Image
(from Adrian Hoskins's 'Learn About Butterflies' site, http://www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/)

This pattern is found in many different families of butterfly and moth. The mechanism behind it is probably different in the case of the butterfly moth (and the moth butterfly!) but convergent evolution is very definitely a thing!!

Guy
Guy's Butterflies: http://www.guypadfield.com

trevor
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby trevor » Tue Jan 30, 2018 10:56 pm

There is only one word to describe your recent sightings / images.
Spectacular !. The world of Butterflies never ceases to amaze.

Best wishes,
Trevor.

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby Tony Moore » Wed Jan 31, 2018 12:07 pm

Many thanks for your kind remarks, Trevor. I feel very privileged to have had the opportunity to see such species.

I have another 'oops' :oops: moment to confess in that the Tiger IDed as Blue Glassy (I. vulgaris, is actually Grey Glassy Tiger (Ideopsis juventa). I did see vulgaris away from the reserve and it was smaller and distinctly bluish. I have corrected the original post. This stuff is so difficult...

Tony.

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David M
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Re: Tony Moore

Postby David M » Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:05 pm

Padfield wrote: There's a surprising amount of it about!

Compare this moth (Castnia cononia) ...

... with this Ithomiid butterfly:

(from Adrian Hoskins's 'Learn About Butterflies' site, http://www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/)

This pattern is found in many different families of butterfly and moth. The mechanism behind it is probably different in the case of the butterfly moth (and the moth butterfly!) but convergent evolution is very definitely a thing!!

Guy


Very illuminating, Guy. many thanks for the info and the link.

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Tony Moore
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Re: Tony Moore. Sabah (cont.).

Postby Tony Moore » Mon Feb 05, 2018 1:15 pm

Tony Moore wrote:The Grey Glassy Tiger was also in good numbers in the reserve:

21-DSC09919_edited-1.jpg

12-tiger.jpg



Most days I managed a walk along the forest edge, where I was delighted to find a Hoary Palmer (Unkana ambasa):

1-DSC09833_edited-1.jpg




Several Common Jezebels (Delias eucharis) were floating about, but the only one, which offered a photographic opportunity was too worn to post. I did find one Banded Demon (Notocrypta paralysos) deeper into the forest:

20-Banded Demon.jpg

I think this must be Chocolate Pansy (Junonia hedonia), but would appreciate confirmation (or otherwise:( ):

13-TBI.jpg

Through the 'Butterfies of Borneo' Facebook page, I met a local butterflyer, who offered to take us Mahua Waterfalls to look for stuff. He brought a couple of bottles of evil smelling fluid, which he had concocted as a bait. The only taker was an Malayan Oakleaf (Kalima limborgi boxtoni

Autumn Leaf.jpg

I also found the decorative larva of another 'leaf' butterfly Autumn Leaf (Doleschallia bisaltide:

1-butterfly cat.jpg

The walk up to the falls produced several interesting species:

The Quaker (Neopithecops zalmora):

16-DSC09851_edited-1.jpg


The Striped Ringlet (Ragadia makuta):

17-Ragadia sp..jpg

A splendid Beetle:

15-DSC09845_edited-1.jpg

Here's one that shouldn't be here at all - not UK and not even a butterfly:
18-DSC09874_edited-1.jpg


It certainly had me fooled until I looked closely at the photograph... What possible evolutionary advantage could accrue to a moth, posing as a butterfly?? The Butterfly Moth (Callidula sakuni) - I think.
The trip was really made by a sudden shout of 'brookiana!!' And there it was in all its glory flapping round and around a roofless old concrete building, which someone had evidently been using as a pissoir. This species had been on my 'hope to see' list since I saw a mounted specimen in Birmingham Natural History Museum aged about 9 years! It flew round me for several minutes, regularly landing to imbibe something suspect from the concrete walls of the shack, but sadly never sat still enough for a proper photograph. This was the best that I could do:

19-Raja Brookes.jpg


It then took off and posed beautifully about 15 metres up a tree!

Still a wonderful ending to a brilliant holiday.


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