Neil Freeman

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Neil Freeman
Posts: 2598
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 6:25 pm
Location: Solihull, West Midlands

Re: Neil Freeman

Postby Neil Freeman » Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:47 pm

Thanks Mark. No Greenfinches on the day unfortunately, they are a bit scarce in my garden and I have only ever seen a couple there.

Cheers Wurzel. I was pleased with that list myself for just an hour. A GS Woodpecker is also there most days but sods law meant that it didn't turn up until later in the afternoon and so missed the list.

Tuesday 6th February

We have just had another similar weekend to the previous one, that is a wet and miserable Saturday followed by a dry Sunday with plenty of blue sky although this time the temperature took a dive through the day.
Since then it has been cold with a bitter wind blowing from the north. Today we have had some light flurries of snow through the day and as I write this it you can see by the light of the streetlights outside that it is it is coming down fairly heavily.

There were more Goldfinches in the garden at the weekend than I usually see, probably attracted to the feeders by the more 'normal' winter we are having, in other words colder than the last few.

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Goldfinches tucking in to black sunflower seeds.


The pair of Blackcaps are still around and the male seems to be getting more confident. Last week he spent most of his time hiding in the bushes whilst the female was visiting the feeders more often.

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Blackcap and Blue Tit


I was quite pleased to get the shot below of a Coal tit as they usually dart in and out again too quickly for me to grab a photo.

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Coal Tit actually sitting still for moment


One of the local foxes was making the most of a sunny spot at the bottom of the garden and I got the distinct impression it was sticking its tongue out at me.

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Fox at the bottom of the garden.


More cold days ahead this week and the slightly milder ones only look to be getting up to 5 or 6 degrees at most so not much sign of spring here yet. Time to get back to thinking about what I would like to see this coming season and making some plans :D

Bye for now,

Neil.

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Wurzel
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Re: Neil Freeman

Postby Wurzel » Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:16 pm

Definitely - almost a wink as well :wink: :lol: Great shot of the Coal Tit, they're hard to capture because, as you, say they'll wait for the other birds to feed and then nip in during a slight lull only to nip off quickly again as soon as another species arrives at the table :D Despite the terrible weather forecast it shouldn't be too long now :D

Have a goodun

Wurzel

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David M
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Re: Neil Freeman

Postby David M » Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:33 pm

Your garden sure is a winter haven for wildlife, Neil. Let's hope in a couple of months time you'll have your usual Speckled Woods to report, along with Holly Blues and all the other spring visitors.

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Andrew555
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Re: Neil Freeman

Postby Andrew555 » Fri Feb 09, 2018 9:51 am

Nice shots Neil, that Coal Tit is great. :)

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Goldie M
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Re: Neil Freeman

Postby Goldie M » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:50 pm

Your right Neil, we're definitely getting similar birds in the garden, Love the shot of the Coal Tit, Goldie :D

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Neil Freeman
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Location: Solihull, West Midlands

Re: Neil Freeman

Postby Neil Freeman » Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:20 pm

Thanks for the comments Wurzel, David, Andrew and Goldie :D

Another cold week here but at least the past couple of days have seen some nice sun which has cheered things up a bit although the mornings have been frosty. There skies have been getting lighter when leaving for work around 06.00 in the morning this week which is a sure sign that spring is not far off irrespective of what the weather does.

Garden Moths 2017 part 2 – The Micros.

In part 1 of my look back at the moths I trapped in my garden last year, I mentioned that 94 out of the total of 245 species that I caught were micros. Out of these, 40 were new records for my garden, mostly due to the fact that I had only started to look at the micros half way through the previous year. Some of these were seen in large numbers, for example a couple of species of the familiar grass moths of the family Crambidae would often be settled all around the outside of the trap as well as inside. This made accurately identifying and counting them impossible as they would often fly off as soon as I approached so my recorded numbers of these are very much a minimum. Other species turned up in smaller numbers and many were recorded as single examples.

A selection of my favourite micros are posted below in rough order in which they appeared. Some of them overwinter as adults and started turning up in the trap in late February which shows how well they are adapted to the cold despite their tiny size and delicate appearance. The numbers in brackets in the comments with the photos are the total individuals of that species recorded during the season.

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Acleris literana (1) - Hibernates as an Adult. New For Garden. 08.03.2017


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Caloptillia sp (1). These can be difficult to ID. 18.03.2017


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Alucita hexadactyla (12) - Twenty-plume Moth. 30.03.2017


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Ancylis badiana (1). 15.05.2017. NFG


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Pseudargyrotoza conwagana (47). 10.06.2017


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Anania hortulata (28). Small Magpie. 10.06.2017


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Archips podana (1). Large Fruit-tree Tortrix. 16.06.201. NFG.


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Archips xylosteana (2). Variegated Golden Tortrix. 18.06.2017. NFG


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Tortrix viridana (2). Green Oak Tortrix. 18.06.2017. NFG


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Lozotaeniodes formosana (1). 20.06.2017.


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Anania coronata (8). 21.06.2017


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Agapeta hamana (1). 21.06.2017. NFG.


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Yponomeuta evonymella (47). Bird-cherry Ermine. 21.06.2017.


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Enarmonia formosana (1). Cherry Bark Tortrix. 21.06.2017


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Spilonota ocellana (2). Bud Moth. 15.07.2017.


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Pammene aurita (4). 17.07.2017.


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Argyresthia goedartella (15). 19.07.2017.


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Carcina quercana (3). 04.08.2017.


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Ypsolopha sequella (1). 23.09.2017. NFG.


The most common moths were Light Brown Apple Moths which I recorded in every month of the year and a couple of the grass Crambids mentioned above, of which I managed to identify 7 different species.

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Crambus pascuella (236). 09.06.2017


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Chrysoteucha culmella (227). 10.06.2017


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Crambus lathoniellus (2). 10.06.2017


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Agriphila tristella (5). 27.08.2017.


So far this year with the night being mostly either too cold or wet and windy I have only had the trap out a couple of times back in January with very limited success, just 1 Red-green Carpet and 3 Light Brown Apple Moths.

Bye for now,

Neil.

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Wurzel
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Re: Neil Freeman

Postby Wurzel » Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:45 pm

Even more cracking moths Neil :D Those micros give the macros a run for their money in the 'plumage' stakes, especially the Enarmonia formosana, what an intricate beauty! :D

Have a goodun

Wurzel

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David M
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Re: Neil Freeman

Postby David M » Sun Feb 18, 2018 6:27 pm

Another stunning selection of moths, Neil, including a few that most of us would scarcely register were we to actually see them.

I particularly like Anania coronata, which I presume is closely related to funebris?

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Andrew555
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Re: Neil Freeman

Postby Andrew555 » Mon Feb 19, 2018 2:44 pm

Fantastic line-up again Neil. :D Some beautiful colours and patterns on display.
The 'wings' of the Twenty-plume moth are fascinating. :)

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Goldie M
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Re: Neil Freeman

Postby Goldie M » Mon Feb 19, 2018 7:12 pm

Hi! Neil, looks like the Black Birds are getting more intelligent :lol: Mine was a Lady. :D Goldie :D


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