Jack Harrison

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Fri Feb 26, 2016 5:42 pm

All my kids loved the 'Hungry Caterpillar'.
And what was the other similar one? The 'Enormous Crocodile' (or something like that)

Today
Ardersier sign1.jpg
Ardersier sign1.jpg (20.79 KiB) Viewed 947 times

Ardersier sign2 (1).jpg
Ardersier sign2 (1).jpg (19.11 KiB) Viewed 947 times

Coastal strip is supposedly a Small Blue (and Dingy Skipper) locality but the habitat I looked at today bears no resemblance to those where I have found the butterflies in England.

Jack

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Tue Mar 08, 2016 7:55 am

Still no butterflies but this is a nice combination.
Image
The little fellow is a Tree Sparrow.

Jack

trevor
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby trevor » Tue Mar 08, 2016 10:33 am

HI Jack,

What an image !, beautifully captured.
As for Butterflies, not much in the south yet either.

Keep well,
Trevor.

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Tue Mar 08, 2016 12:32 pm

A few minutes ago
Image
Tree Sparrow left, male House Sparrow right.
The Tree Sparrow is maybe 5% further away, but really is a smaller slimmer bird.
House Sparrow (male and female different) is much chunkier especially male.
Other i/d pointers for Tree Sparrow (male and female similar) :
Brown cap
Below eye white with prominent dark cheek patch.
White collar round neck

Jack

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David M
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby David M » Thu Mar 10, 2016 7:36 pm

Great image, Jack. Nice to see a) the difference between these two bird species, and b) how well you look after your local wildlife (they clearly love your feeders).

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Thu Mar 10, 2016 8:08 pm

how well you look after your local wildlife (they clearly love your feeders)
In fact, wife Stella is chief feeder. I daren't say it too loudly but she is rapidly developing quite an interest in birds. Only a few minutes ago (now fully dark) she told me that geese were [heard] flying over, Pinkfeet possibly on their way north at the end of winter.

Earlier, a flock of circa 35 Whooper Swans on a loch near Elgin gradually fragmented and they left on flocks of 8 to 10 - for Iceland/Greenland perhaps?Image

Jack

PhilBWright
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby PhilBWright » Sat Mar 12, 2016 6:04 am

Dear Jack,

I am still waiting for the Brimstone Butterfly to "blow its cover in Lincolnshire"
Would you say 15 degrees Celsius is about right in the correct microclimatic conditions?
"Lincoln Green was and is perfect"

Kind Regards,

Philip

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Sat Mar 12, 2016 6:40 am

15 degrees Celsius is more than warm enough. Brimstones become active at far lower temperatures but in my experience, sunshine is more important. In bright sun, 10C is warm enough.

In broad terms, figures are similar for other hibernators. In cloudy conditions, around 15C is required for activity.

Note: approximate figures and not to be taken as definitive or applicable to all species. Red Admirals for example can be active in sunshine in much lower temperatures provided it is sunny.

Jack

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Tue Mar 15, 2016 8:10 am

Moths Lethen (near Nairn) 15th March

Three in Skinner trap, all different species.

Chestnut (thanks Scott for earlier i/d)

Hebrew Character

and this believed to be Spring Usher but open to correction.

Image

Misty sunrise from the garden.
Image

Jack

maverick
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby maverick » Tue Mar 15, 2016 8:18 pm

Love the tree sparrows jack.I've always wanted to know the difference between the two as I have probably have seen them but not realised.
I'm lucky with the birds in my garden although I do spend a lot on food .
Regulars include nuthatch(just loves the black sunflower seed)male and female Bulfinch and a couple of messy goldfinches

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Fri Mar 18, 2016 9:28 am

Lethen near Nairn
Moth i/d please (trapped 18th March)
03-18-341-Chestnut-poss.jpg
I might suspect Clouded Drab or Chestnut (size is right) but the guides I have looked at don't show any white dots.

Jack

dave brown
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby dave brown » Mon Mar 28, 2016 3:51 pm

Jack,
Although the general colour looks a bit odd the white markings strongly suggest Satellite. I know that some moths are darker the further North you go so maybe this is well within range for Satellite.
Dave

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Mon Mar 28, 2016 4:22 pm

Thanks. Another suggestion was Satellite so I go along with that.

I wouldn't guarantee that the colours have reproduced accurately.

Jack

downland boy
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby downland boy » Tue Mar 29, 2016 8:26 am

Hi Jack, if there is any lingering doubt about your Satellite, it definitely is a Satellite (Eupsilia transversa). The main spot with the two accompanying satellite spots on each forewing is diagnostic. These spots can be variable in colour and intensity but the arrangement is always the same. Only very rarely are they completely absent.
All the best, db.

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Neil Freeman
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Neil Freeman » Thu Mar 31, 2016 8:37 pm

Hi Jack, I am enjoying your recent moth reports having just bought myself a moth trap and looking forward to finding out what I get in my garden.

Looking forward to see what else you get up there.

Neil.

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Fri Apr 01, 2016 5:49 am

Here is my list for March. some have already been identified by others but some remain unsue.

Image

Top row left to right (confirmed): Chestnut, Hebrew Character,Satellite, Clouded Drab

Middle row First and second left (confirmed): Dotted Border, March Moth.

Middle third , fourth plus bottom row not sure.

Jack

downland boy
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby downland boy » Sat Apr 02, 2016 8:37 am

Hi Jack, looking at your last four moths on the grid I would suggest Powdered Quaker (ground colour can be very variable in this species), 2 x Early Tooth-striped and Pale Brindled Beauty (both examples of the last two species are much more heavily marked than I see in my southern garden). No matter how good a photo is and with no scale, it is always easier to id species with the live moth in front of you. From the photo of Pale Brindle Beauty, the ground colour is similar to Brindled Beauty but the moth doesn't look "heavy" enough and the markings are more Pale Brindled Beauty. Hope these suggestions point you in the right direction.
All the best, db.

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Sat Apr 02, 2016 11:26 am

Many thanks. As I photograph moths for i/d and record purposes and not for aesthetic reasons, the inclusion of a scale in the picture will no doubt help.

I would look at you idents and then modify by image caption. Bit busy at the moment though.

Jack

downland boy
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby downland boy » Sat Apr 02, 2016 1:17 pm

Hi Jack, I'm starting to doubt my suggestion of Powdered Quaker. If you have the Manley guide, the highland form of Clouded Drab looks a good fit. Plenty for you to scratch your head over. db

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Jack Harrison
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Re: Jack Harrison

Postby Jack Harrison » Sat Apr 02, 2016 1:47 pm

Quaker/Powdered Quaker/??? Larger image by clicking.
16-03-25-005-common-quaker.jpg
Little processing except slight increase in contrast to show features to aid i/d.
Aren't butterfles easy by comparison?

Jack


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