Northern Brown Argus Aberrations

Due to the sheer number of named aberrations for some species, not all are shown on the species pages - only those for which corresponding images are available. This page, however, provides access to all of the named aberrations for a given species, where known and Goodson & Read (1969) is a key resource in this regard.

Species:

Introduction

Description to be completed.

Unclassified Aberrations

salmacis pale abberation - Wensleydale  8th June 2012

Photo © Reverdin
08-Jun-2012

salmacis pale abberation - Wensleydale  8th June 2012

Photo © Reverdin
08-Jun-2012

Northern Brown Argus - female aberration - Burnmouth - 09-Jul-13

Photo © Pete Eeles
09-Jul-2013

Northern Brown Argus - female aberration - Burnmouth - 09-Jul-13-10

Photo © Pete Eeles
09-Jul-2013

Northern Brown Argus - female aberration - Burnmouth - 09-Jul-13-18

Photo © Pete Eeles
09-Jul-2013

Northern Brown Argus (m) (ssp.salmacis) (aberration) 4.7.12 Smardale Gill, Cumbria.

Photo © downland boy
This aberration is similar to ab.unicolor that occurs in Aricia agestis
04-Jul-2012

Northern Brown Argus ssp. artaxerxes ab. quadripuncta

Photo © Trev Sawyer
14th July 2014 - Burnmouth

Photo Album (7 photos) ...


ab. albimaculata (Harrison.Ent.Rec.1905.17.p.281.)

On the upperside of the hindwing each red lunule is followed by a clear white dash. Underside the same as ab. vedrae Harrison which is an underside form. Described from the mixed salmacis group.

ab. caeruleo-annulata (Carter & Harrison.Entom.1923.56.p.107.)

On the upperside the black discoidal spot of the forewings is ringed with blue scales. Sometimes the blue is only on the extreme edge of the surround, white scales showing also. Described from the mixed salmacis group.

ab. caeruleopuncta (Tutt.Brit.Lep.1912.XI.p.243.)

Specimens of artaxerxes with the white discoidal spot of the forewings replaced by blue.

ab. chrysophanoides (Harrison & Carter.Vasculum.1929.15.p.147.)

At its minimum expression the forewings are powdered with coppery scales appearing as a wedge travelling outwards from the discoidal spot, whilst at its maximum these suffusions display themselves as coppery wedges more or less concentrated along the veins.

ab. eos (Carter & Harrison.Vasculum.1929.15.p.147.)

On the upperside all four wings show a black discoidal spot, that of the hindwings being fainter but definite.

ab. garretti (Carter & Harrison.Vasculum.1929.15.p.17.)

On the upperside the black discoidal spots of the forewings are ringed with white. On the hindwings the discoidals are white as in ab. quadripunctata Tutt.

ab. icaroides (Harrison & Carter.Vasculum.1929.15.p.148.)

Upperside with white discoidal spots on the forewings as in the Scotch and Durham artaxerxes form. In addition it is suffused along the termen inwardly with bluish-white scales. In some specimens the suffusion is so strong that it would be more correct to describe the ground colour as bluish-white. At first glance it appears to be a hybrid between icarus [Polyommatus icarus, Common Blue] and agestis but it is an aberrant agestis. From Fifeshire and probably restricted to artaxerxes form.

ab. inclara (Harrison.Ent.Rec.1905.17.p.281.)

Dwarf form occurring throughout the range of salmacis and artaxerxes, only two thirds the size of typical astrarche [syn. Aricia agestis, Brown Argus]. Underside silvery grey like C. minima [syn. Cupido minimus, Small Blue], the white ocelli very small and indistinct, the row of four near the basal angle reduced to two. The name must be restricted to artaxerxes and salmacis forms.

ab. quadripuncta (Tutt.Brit.Butts.1896.p.180.)

Specimens of artaxerxes showing a white discoidal spot on the hindwings as well as the forewings.

ab. recessa (Carter & Harrison.Entom.1923.56.p.108.)

On the upperside a total disappearance of the discoidal spots, whether white, black, or blue. Described from the mixed salmacis group.

ab. similis (Tutt.Brit.Lep.1912.XI.p.244.)

Since Stephens described the female of his ‘salmacis’ as possessing a white discoidal spot on the forewings Tutt says there is no name for the male with a white spot and gives ‘similis’ for it. Since these white-spotted examples of both sexes are actually artaxerxes appearing in the mixed population there is no need for the name. If it is used at all it must be restricted to the artaxerxes-like form occurring in the Durham area but it would seem ridiculous to call the female form salmacis and the male form similis.

ab. subquadripunctata (Harrison.Ent.Rec.1906.18.p.236.)

Like quadripuncta Tutt with white discoidal spots on all four wings but showing black pupils. Described from the mixed salmacis group. Presumably this would show more white than albiannulata and is on all four wings. Harrison’s albiannulata had the black discoidal spot ringed with white but he does not say if it is on forewings only; it is a synonym of snelleni ter Haar which occurs among English populations as well as salmacis.